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2 edition of Hydrologic factors and environmental impacts of mass soil movementsin the Oregon Coast Range found in the catalog.

Hydrologic factors and environmental impacts of mass soil movementsin the Oregon Coast Range

Gary Leslie Ketcheson

Hydrologic factors and environmental impacts of mass soil movementsin the Oregon Coast Range

by Gary Leslie Ketcheson

  • 20 Want to read
  • 14 Currently reading

Published by Water Resources Research Institute, Oregon State University in [Corvallis, Ore .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Landslides -- Oregon.,
  • Watersheds -- Oregon.,
  • Hydrology -- Oregon.

  • Edition Notes

    Also issued online.

    Statementby Gary Ketcheson and Henry A. Froehlich.
    SeriesWRRI -- 56., WRRI (Series) -- 56.
    ContributionsFroehlich, Henry A.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination94 p. :
    Number of Pages94
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14177452M

    gon Coast Range. Cities are concentrated near the coast and along the Willamette Valley margin. Ag-riculture is mostly limited to the Willamette Valley and other large river valleys. Major forest landowners in the Coast Range include private industry, private nonindustrial owners, the state of Oregon, and the federal government (Spies et al. ). influence of environment, disturbance, and ownership on patterns of forest vegetation biodiversity across a large forested region, the 3-million-ha Oregon Coast Range (USA). Gradients in tree species composition were strongly associated with environment, especially in response to environmental and disturbance factors. Specific objectives Cited by:

    -1 Impacts of biological soil crust disturbance and composition on C and N loss from water erosion NICHOLE N. BARGER1,*, JEFFREY E. HERRICK2, JUSTIN VAN ZEE2 and JAYNE BELNAP1,3 1The Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO ; 2USDA – ARS Jornada Experimental Range, Las Cruces, NM ; 3USGS – BRD Canyonlands. forested portion of the coastal province of Oregon, many of our findings can be generalized to other regions, and our analytical approach is widely applicable to biodiversity assessments in general. METHODS Study area The Oregon Coast Range encompasses ; km2, about 80% of which is forested (Fig. 1). Elevations range from sea level to over.

    Coast Range Ecoregion REMAP Report Ecological Condition of Streams in the Coast Range Ecoregion of Oregon and Washington Lillian G. Herger and Gretchen Hayslip U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10 Office of Environmental Assessment Sixth Avenue Seattle, Washington Publication Number: EPA R Suggested Citation: Herger, L.G. and G. Hayslip. Impacts of Hiking and Camping on Soils and Vegetation: A Review David N. Cole Introduction Ecotourism affects local environments in many ways. Although some of the most dramatic environmental changes result from development of the infrastructure to support tourism, more widespread impacts result from the recreational activities that tourists.


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Hydrologic factors and environmental impacts of mass soil movementsin the Oregon Coast Range by Gary Leslie Ketcheson Download PDF EPUB FB2

Mass soil movements of four types; debris avalanche, debris torrent, debris slide and bank slough, were field inventoried in the Oregon Coast Range. A total of mass movements were located in 21 undisturbed watersheds and 13 clearcuts harvested in the last six years.

Failures associated with roads and landings were not included in this Cited by:   Two major cohesionless soil series of the central Coast Ranges of Oregon were examined for soil and hydrologic properties. Although derived from different parent material, the Bohannon and Klickitat series exhibited nearly identical values of soil and hydrologic properties.

Aggregation in both soils was found to be the most important property, for it influences shear strength Cited by: Mass wasting is a dominant geomorphic process in the Oregon Coast Range, with significant mechanisms ranging from soil creep due to frost heave (pipkrake) to deep-seated rotational slides.

Activity is concentrated in the winter months (December through March) and is usually associated with significant precipitation or snow-melt by: 6.

Rainfall simulator measurements of infiltration capacity of forest roads in the central Oregon Coast Range were reported to range from to mm/hr (Marbet, ). The Oregon Coast Range is dissected by numerous unchanneled headwater basins, which can generate shallow landslides and debris flows during heavy or prolonged rainfall.

An automated monitoring system was installed in an unchanneled headwater basin to measure rainfall, volumetric water content, groundwater temperature, and pore pressures at minute intervals.

Hydrologic Monitoring of a Landslide-Prone Hillslope in the Elliott State Forest, Southern Coast Range, Oregon, – By Joel B. Smith, Jonathan W. Godt, Rex L. Baum, Jeffrey A. Coe, William J.

Burns, Ning Lu, Michael M. Morse, Basak Sener-Kaya, and Murat Kaya. Portions of the Oregon Coast Range are highly dissected with narrow ridgetops, steep slopes (32–47°), and local re - lief typically less than m (Fig.

Coast Range than in an area the size of an individual stand or a small watershed. Figure Occurrence and distribution of (a) all plots, (b) Oregon white oak, (c) madrone, (d) Sitka spruce and (e) western hemlock in forest plots in the Oregon Coast Range.

(a) (b). A Soil-Geomorphic Study in the Oregon Coast Range C. BALSTER AND R. PARSONS Detailed mapping of 3, acres of the Coast Range near Kings Valley, Oregon, (Figure 1) has shown well-defined relationships be-tween soils and geomorphic surfaces. The area encompasses a variety of landscapes, varying from a deeply dissected highland on the east to.

Oregon Coast Range in the extreme west-central part of Oregon (fig. It is bordered on the west by the Pacific Ocean. The eastern boundary is about 13 miles southwest of Corvallis and about 18 miles northwest of Eugene. The watershed occupies aboutacres, or about square miles, and consists of parts of three counties.

The Coast Range ecoregion is a Level III ecoregion designated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the U.S. states of Washington, Oregon, and stretches along the Pacific Coast from the tip of the Olympic Peninsula in the north to the San Francisco Bay in the south, including Grays Harbor, Willapa Bay, and the Long Beach Peninsula in Washington, the entire length of the Borders: Puget Lowland (2), Willamette Valley (3).

In this paper, we investigate the direct current (DC) resistivity method as a tool for quickly estimating soil thickness over a steep (33–40°) zero-order basin in the Oregon Coast Range, a landslide prone region. Point measurements throughout the basin showed bedrock depths between and m.

- a soils educational portal developed by the National Soil Resources Institute (NSRI), the largest UK national and international centre for research and development, consultancy and training in soils and their interaction with the atmosphere, land use, geology and water resources.

hydrologic significance. The experimental watersheds of the Alsea Study in the coast range provided a basis for determining possible changes on individual hydrograph factors.

Objectives The primary objective of this research is to determine the effect of clearcut logging on individual runoff events from two watersheds in Oregon's Coast Range.

The Oregon Soil and Water Conservation District Guidebook provides information and directions to assist conservation district directors, associate directors, directors emeritus, and employees to carry out the conservation district’s statutory responsibilities.

Soil chronosequences on marine terraces along the Pacific Coast of California and Oregon show evidence of podzolization, though soils ultimately evolve to Ultisols. It is not clear if this pathway of soil evolution can be extended to the humid, inland Oregon Coast by: 9.

HYDROLOGIC SENSITIVITY TO CLIMATE AND LAND USE CHANGES IN THE SANTIAM RIVER BASIN, OREGON1 Cristina Mateus, Desiree D. Tullos, and Christopher G. Surfleet2 ABSTRACT: Future changes in water supply are likely to vary across catchments due to a river basin’s sensitiv-ity to climate and land use changes.

Diagenetic variation in the Oregon Coast Range: Implications for rock strength, soil production, hillslope form, and landscape evolution Jill A. Marshall 1and Joshua J. Roering 1Department of Geological Sciences, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon, USA Abstract The mechanisms by which lithology modulates geomorphic processes are poorly known.

In the. Pavements affect the hydrologic cycle, soil and air temperature, and nutrient cycling. Because of their effect on the surrounding environment, pavements inherently affect remnant or planted trees.

They are believed to negatively affect tree growth and survival, thereby compromising the ecological, social, and economic benefits otherwise derived Cited by: 2.

California’s Hydrologic Cycle coast and into the Central Valley typically in the form of liquid rainfall.

As storms move east out of the valley, and encounters a mountain range, the air mass is forced to rise. As the air mass rises, it expands and cools, called. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS IN COASTAL AND ESTUARINE WATERS BIBLIOGRAPHIC SERIES - VOLUME I COAST OF OREGON by George R.

Ditsworth Disposal Co Marine Waters Project Research Branch Pacific Northwest Water Laboratory Corvallis, Oregon FEDERAL WATER POLLUTION CONTROL ADMINISTRATION October The amount and type of carbon (C) in a forest soil reflects the past balance between C accumulation and loss.

In an old-growth forest soil, C is thought to be in dynamic equilibrium between accumulations and losses. Disturbance upsets this equilibrium by altering the microclimate, the amount and type of vegetation growing on a site, and properties that affect organic matter by: wetland study sites and to develop an approach for monitoring potential impacts once pumping begins.

In andbaseline data were collected on the hydrology, vegetation, and soil characteristics at five forested wetland study sites in the Big River Management Area.

Four of the sites were located in.